Thoughts on Free Communication redux

broken-cell-phone

I’m doing some international traveling at the moment. Wanting to stay in touch with loved ones has me contemplating Thoughts on Free Communication once again. It seems that all the pieces are there … I wish I had the headroom to set something up.

An alternative I hadn’t considered is Mumble+Murmur. An old post from Keshav Khera has turned me onto the idea that gamers might inadvertently lead the way toward decentralized and self-controlled realtime communication, and Mumble+Murmur seems to hold some promise in that area. AFAIK, it doesn’t support video and the Android clients don’t seem so very awesome, but at least one of them is FOSS. Something to look more deeply into.

Custom six-channel DAC

the DAC's guts

Last week I finished delivery of a custom 6-channel DAC for mastering engineer Greg Reierson at Rare Form Mastering. It uses three stereo DAC cards I designed previously for Audio by Van Alstine, Inc. (currently used in their production DACs) and six custom dual-differential gain/filter cards. I designed the gain/filter cards to use an absolute minimum of active stages—something I have consistently found to help subjective performance.

Greg reports that the new DAC is dead silent and delivers noticeably better LF control than his previous setup. We hope to do some gain-stage device (that’s opaque-speak for “opamp”) comparisons down the road to see if things can be improved further. He will be using the new DAC for general monitoring and also to drive his newly acquired Neumann VMS 70 cutting lathe.

Stitching layers between copper zones in KiCad

old-sewing-machine-11284647472AxtX

Note: This is a 2011 repost from the now mostly defunct Biro Technology blog. I’m reposting it because it’s good information that belongs here. (P.S. Added it to the wiki.)

I’ve been working a bit with KiCad lately and have run into a problem in PCBnew with “stitching” (i.e., adding vias between) filled zones on top and bottom layers. This is something you typically do if you have flooded the unused spaces on both top and bottom of your board with copper and have connected the floods to ground or some other reference.

The KiCad FAQ outlines a process for doing this, and it works fine until you refill (i.e., re-pour) the zones–or the DRC refills them for you. When the zones are refilled, the vias you added for stitching become isolated from the zones and end up as little pads floating in space.

The problem and a workaround was discussed in a recent thread on the kicad-users mailing list. I wanted to summarize here the workaround in a slightly less terse way:

  1. Route the board and define your zones as you always have.
  2. Fill the zones as you always have.
  3. Select “Add tracks and vias” from the toolbar on the right.
  4. Click on an existing pad that’s connected to the zone’s net, drag the pointer a little bit to create a short track, then either (a) right-click and select “Place Via” or (b) type the ‘V’ shortcut.
  5. To add more stitching vias, continue to drag the pointer and type ‘V’ where you want to drop vias (or right-click and select “Place Via”).
  6. When you are done placing vias, hit the ‘End’ key on your keyboard (or right click and select “End Track”).

You can repeat this as many times as you want to create different clusters of stitches. When you refill zones, the vias will retain the connectivity information and work as expected.

OSH Park board order

PCB

Since Olimex’s PCB prototype service is currently offline, I decided to try another provider for a project I’m working on. The one I settled on is OSH Park, and I have to say the online ordering process worked far more smoothly than I expected. I uploaded a *.zip file full of Gerbers exported directly from KiCad, and the system recognized everything perfectly. Here’s hoping the boards turn out equally fine.

One bit of advice: As near as I can tell, KiCad’s layer alignment targets only add extra square inches to your design for which you will be charged, so you may as well leave them off.

Arduino and Bio-inspired Design

A week ago Monday I did a guest lecture on Arduino for Marc Swackhamer and Neil Olszewski’s graduate architecture course on bio-inspired design. It was an awesome experience–lots of bright and enthusiastic minds. We followed the lecture up with a studio on Wednesday, and later today I will be assisting with reviews. Many thanks to Marc for letting me participate in this inspiring process.

Gradually going Git?

I’ve been using Mercurial along with Bitbucket for project hosting for quite a while now. I’ve also grown quite fond of EasyMercurial to help manage my repositories. However, I have started to wonder if I should consider using Git as my defacto standard VCS.

I was originally attracted to Mercurial over Git because I got the sense that Git was an almost hackish amalgam of various scripts written in a variety of languages—and because it encapsulated a lot more “power” (read: “complexity”) than I saw myself needing. And while Linux was (and is) my main OS, Windows support for Git was sorta grimmish. Bitbucket’s hosting policies at the time seemed better than the closest Git-equivalent: GitHub (still do—BB’s unlimited private repos in particular), and Redmine offered an easy self-hosted project management solution including repository, wiki, issue reporting, etc. as well. Gitourious was available at the time but was (and is) feature incomplete compared to Redmine. I can’t remember if Trac supported either at this point.

So why consider changing? I’ve recently noticed what appears to be a mad rush to use Git in general and GitHub in particular–so much so that I’m wondering if Git is going to become the defacto industry standard soon. Changing to Git may not be as huge a deal as it might seem at first because Bitbucket, RhodeCode and Trac now let you use Git repositories in addition to Mercurial, and it seems Git’s support for Windows has improved. There are also a number of GUI Git clients available for all major platforms—though none of them seem as sweetly usable as EasyMercurial.

I may just try managing my next project with Git as a test-case. Worst case: convert the Git repo to Mercurial.

FPAleksandr

FPAleksandr is a theme for FlatPress that I am porting from Mat Wiseman’s insanely awesome Aleksandr, originally made for Textpattern.

It’s available in my Bitbucket, and there’s also a FlatPress forum discussion.

I tried to remain as faithful as possible to the original, but some things were just not going to translate directly—the footers, for instance. The best solution I was able to arrive at for the footers takes away some of the elegance of the original, but given the limits of the platform I don’t think it’s all that bad.

There are still some bugs to squash and lipstick to be applied, but it’s basically usable as-is.

Are there any good blogging engines?

I’ve spent the last few days evaluating various self-hosted blogging engines from three different points of view: as an author, a designer, and a developer/maintainer. And I haven’t been able to find anything that doesn’t have a significant issue in at least one of those areas.

Of course, you might be wondering why I’m bothering at all. Why not just host your blog(s) at Blogger or WordPress.com or Tumblr or Posterous? The main reason is that I think it’s a good idea to own your data, and self-hosted anything is one way to do that.

The next question is why I just don’t stick with WordPress and call it a day? It turns out that the popularity of this platform makes it a target for hackers and other miscreants. It’s the Windows malware problem all over again. Vulnerability through lack of obscurity.

One option is to install WP and then lock it down as much as possible. And that may very well be what I end up doing, because I’m at a loss for anything that sucks less.