Client rejections

Photo by Steve Johnson on Unsplash (544215)

It happens sooner or later to all consulting designers: your client decides not to use your work or — if it’s what they hired you for — take your advice.

Now what?

First of all, remind yourself that as a design professional you’re not taking anything personally. It might also help to remind yourself that contrary to a lot of narratives, it’s not your job to “make the client happy.” Rather it’s your job to solve your client’s problems as best you can. It’s your client’s prerogative to accept or reject your work. There may be a million reasons for a client not to adopt your solutions or take your advice. Whatever the reason, you cannot afford to take it personally.

Continue reading “Client rejections”

JavaScript’s prototypal inheritance

In this final part of our series on JavaScript prototypes, we’re going to discuss using them to implement inheritance as it’s typically thought of in classical object-oriented design. Having said that, I once again suggest that you try to put aside what you may already know about how objects and inheritance work in other languages and treat the way JavaScript works as its OwnThing.

So, let’s get on with it.

Continue reading “JavaScript’s prototypal inheritance”

JavaScript and ‘this’, arrow function edition

In a previous installment, we took a dive into the this variable and how it behaves in different ES5 situations. In this installment, we’ll do the same but for so-called arrow functions, introduced in ES6.

Continue reading “JavaScript and ‘this’, arrow function edition”

The JavaScript prototype chain

So far we’ve learned what the relationship is between an object and its constructor’s prototype and what happens when we change properties set on the prototype. In particular, we learned that if you try to access a property of on object, the JavaScript engine will first look in the object itself for the property, and it if doesn’t find it there it looks in its __proto__ property, which is also the constructor’s prototype.

This leads to a good question: What happens if the property isn’t in the constructor’s prototype either? One possible answer is that the JavaScript engine gives up and says the property is undefined. But that’s not what happens.

Continue reading “The JavaScript prototype chain”

Designing out designers?

I’m teaching myself React, the JavaScript library du jour that’s meant “for building user interfaces.” Interestingly, it doesn’t use a templating language. Instead it offers JSX: an extension of the JavaScript language that lets you write JS code that looks very much like HTML and that can be rendered into HTML. On the surface this seems like a cool idea, but the apparent simplicity starts to break down when you want to do anything other than straight-line HTML.

Continue reading “Designing out designers?”

JavaScript prototypes

This is the first in a series of posts intended as a gentle guide through the realm of JavaScript prototypes. If you’re coming here from a class-based language like Java, PHP, C#, or C++ I suggest you put aside everything you know about how objects and inheritance work in those languages. Try to treat the way JavaScript works as its OwnThing.

Continue reading “JavaScript prototypes”

JavaScript and ‘this’

Keeping your head square about JavaScript’s this variable can be a little challenging. A wonderfully concise summary on the issue is found in chuckj’s answer to a StackOverflow question (modified here to account for differences between ECMAScript 5’s strict and non-strict modes):

this can be thought of as an additional parameter to the function that is bound at the call site. If the function is not called as a method then the global object (non-strict mode) or undefined (strict mode) is passed as this.”

Let’s see what this means (pun intended?) for various scenarios.

Continue reading “JavaScript and ‘this’”

Designers are developers

It’s common in the web and app development industry for stakeholders to make a distinction between “designers” and “developers”. One of the things I’ve noted about this distinction is that it opens the door to antagonistic perceptions and even behaviors between the two camps. At a conference a few years ago, in the presence of developers expressing disparaging views regarding designers, I suggested that, “Designers are developers.” The deafening silence suggested I had to explain what I meant:

Continue reading “Designers are developers”

What is a single-ended amplifier?

Single-ended amplifiers, whether made with triodes (as in the single-ended triode, or SET, amplifier), pentodes, or solid state devices, entered the high-end consumer audio consciousness a couple decades ago, and they continue to have a particular pull for a certain camp of audiophiles. This may lead the rest of us to wonder whether these folks are onto something that we should pay attention to. However, there seems to be some confusion regarding what exactly single-ended amplifier are. So I thought I’d try to clear things up a little.

So, what exactly is a single-ended amplifier?

It might be easier if we first cover what isn’t a single-ended amplifier.

Continue reading “What is a single-ended amplifier?”